Electronics Directory: Your Source For “Magical” Solutions}

Filed under: Gates — 3DpXs5 @ 2:03 am, May 18, 2017.

Electronics Directory: Your Source for “Magical” Solutions

by

Daniel Frenchy

An electronics directory is an invaluable tool for the following categories of users:

An electronics engineer seeking to develop innovative products and solutions,

Businessperson seeking electronic components needed for making their products, and

Businessperson seeking saleable products to start a business.

Then there is the consumer looking for the best source of some electronic product she or he wants.

A look at electronics, and the contents of a typical electronics directory, would provide a better perspective to understand the value of an electronics directory.

What Is Electronics?

Electronic devices like semiconductors, resistors, inductors, capacitors, nano-structures and the historic vacuum tubes have transformed the way we do many things. Some of these ways would have been considered magic in an earlier age.

Electronics theory is a branch of physics that studies the flow of charges through different materials, and devices like the semiconductors mentioned above.

YouTube Preview Image

Electronic applications involve design and construction of electronic circuits to achieve different results. The computers you use produce useful results by using an electronic circuit, for example.

In addition to processing data, as the electronic circuit of a computer does, another main function of circuits involves conversion and distribution of electric power.

What Could You Expect to See in an Electronics Directory?

The following illustrative list shows the kinds of products and services you could locate through an electronics directory.

Access Control and Tracking

Automated Equipment & Solutions

Cables & Accessories

Coding, Marking & Tracking

Connectors and Terminals

Consulting / Design Engineers

Conveyor Systems & Accessories

Electronic Cleaners & Lubricants

Enclosures & Accessories

Intrinsically Safe Equipment for hazardous areas, …

Printed Circuits Boards design, manufacture, …

Publications & Engineering Related Software

Research, New Product Developments, …

RF and Wireless Components

Semiconductors

Semiconductors – Amplifiers

Semiconductors – Computational

Semiconductors – Discretes

Semiconductors – Signal Conversion

Semiconductors – Signal Routing and Conditioning

Semiconductors – Sockets, Heat Sinks & Accessories

Semiconductors – Timing Functions

Test & Measurement – Oscilloscopes, analyzers, loggers, calibration

Training & Education

(Source: engnetglobal.com/ )

Even a layperson would be able to get some idea of what many of the different electronic components do, from lists like the above. The electronic directory also lists services like design consultancy and information sources like relevant publications.

Regional Directories

A regional electronics directory lists only suppliers located in a specific region. Such regional directories do two main things.

Firstly, they help users located in that region to find suppliers near them. Secondly, these directories seek to promote the region’s businesses by helping users in other regions know about the products and capabilities available in a particular region.

Conclusion

Electronics underlies many products and services that would have seemed magical even two generations ago. Electronics involves the study of the flow of charges through different materials and devices. The know-how gained thus is utilized in designing electronic circuits that perform useful things like data processing and power conversion. An electronics directory would be an invaluable source of products and services needed by an electronics designer and by businesspersons looking for electronic components and products.

About the Author:

Daniel Frenchy is with businessmagnet, an award winning business Electronics directory

listing over 70,000 businesses offering over 20,000 products and services. The directory indexes listings by company, town, postcode and product, making it very user-friendly.

Article Source:

Electronics Directory: Your Source for “Magical” Solutions

}

Demonstrators protest Condoleezza Rice’s trip to Australia

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 2:03 am, .

Thursday, March 16, 2006

Anti-war demonstrators in Sydney, Australia on Thursday dubbed U.S. Secretary of State Dr Condoleezza Rice a “war criminal” and “murderer.” Two protesters were evicted and five people were arrested during protests against the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.

Dr Rice, on a three-day trip to Australia, said she understood why people found it hard to be positive about Iraq when all they saw on their television screens was violence.

Soon after Rice began her speech at the University of Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music, two protesters shouted from the rear of the auditorium, “Condoleezza Rice, you are a war criminal,” and “Iraqi blood is on your hands and you cannot wash that blood away.” Standing with their palms towards her, the young man and woman repeated their accusation until security intervened to remove them from the hall.

About 15 minutes into Rice’s address, a third protester appeared at a balcony door, interrupting her speech as she referred to freedom. “What kind of freedom are you talking about? You are a murderer,” said the demonstrator before he was quietly escorted from the hall. “I’m very glad to see that democracy is well and alive here at the university,” she said.

In her speech, Rice sought to justify the U.S. occupation of Iraq, describing Iraqis as now more free. One student asked about abuses committed by U.S. forces at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. She said the abuses had made her “sick to her stomach.” However, she defended Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where human rights groups say detainees are held in inhumane conditions and in detention flouting international laws.

Before Rice began her speech, about 50 protesters were gathered at the front gates of the Conservatorium. The group were confronted by police on horseback and by police dogs. Police used the horses to charge into the group of activists and push them back, as a police helicopter hovered.

A police spokeswoman said the group was blocking pedestrian access to the building and that police had spent more than 20 minutes warning them to move. The police then moved in and pushed the crowd back 20 metres. Police say five people have been charged with “hindering police in the execution of their duties.”

The “Stop the War Coalition” says Rice is a “war criminal” and is not welcome in Australia. The group’s spokeswoman, Anna Samson, says the protest is one of many planned in the lead-up to the third anniversary of the invasion and occupation of Iraq on March 20.

Paddy Gibson, from the University of Sydney’s Student’s Council, says the protest is in opposition to the Iraq war, and to the use of the University of Sydney’s campus to host Rice, “the most powerful woman in the world,” who they say is a war criminal. “They’re saying, ‘… you’ve got Sydney Uni’s support to stand up and peddle your murderous hate speeches,’ which is what we see it,” he said.

“You’ve got 180,000 people killed, as we said, for no other reason than strategic control of the region’s oil resources. And the anti-Muslim racism that’s been whipped up to justify this war is being felt by Sydney University students,” said Mr Gibson.

Demonstrators protest Condoleezza Rice’s trip to Australia

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 2:03 am, .

Thursday, March 16, 2006

Anti-war demonstrators in Sydney, Australia on Thursday dubbed U.S. Secretary of State Dr Condoleezza Rice a “war criminal” and “murderer.” Two protesters were evicted and five people were arrested during protests against the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq.

Dr Rice, on a three-day trip to Australia, said she understood why people found it hard to be positive about Iraq when all they saw on their television screens was violence.

Soon after Rice began her speech at the University of Sydney’s Conservatorium of Music, two protesters shouted from the rear of the auditorium, “Condoleezza Rice, you are a war criminal,” and “Iraqi blood is on your hands and you cannot wash that blood away.” Standing with their palms towards her, the young man and woman repeated their accusation until security intervened to remove them from the hall.

About 15 minutes into Rice’s address, a third protester appeared at a balcony door, interrupting her speech as she referred to freedom. “What kind of freedom are you talking about? You are a murderer,” said the demonstrator before he was quietly escorted from the hall. “I’m very glad to see that democracy is well and alive here at the university,” she said.

In her speech, Rice sought to justify the U.S. occupation of Iraq, describing Iraqis as now more free. One student asked about abuses committed by U.S. forces at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. She said the abuses had made her “sick to her stomach.” However, she defended Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where human rights groups say detainees are held in inhumane conditions and in detention flouting international laws.

Before Rice began her speech, about 50 protesters were gathered at the front gates of the Conservatorium. The group were confronted by police on horseback and by police dogs. Police used the horses to charge into the group of activists and push them back, as a police helicopter hovered.

A police spokeswoman said the group was blocking pedestrian access to the building and that police had spent more than 20 minutes warning them to move. The police then moved in and pushed the crowd back 20 metres. Police say five people have been charged with “hindering police in the execution of their duties.”

The “Stop the War Coalition” says Rice is a “war criminal” and is not welcome in Australia. The group’s spokeswoman, Anna Samson, says the protest is one of many planned in the lead-up to the third anniversary of the invasion and occupation of Iraq on March 20.

Paddy Gibson, from the University of Sydney’s Student’s Council, says the protest is in opposition to the Iraq war, and to the use of the University of Sydney’s campus to host Rice, “the most powerful woman in the world,” who they say is a war criminal. “They’re saying, ‘… you’ve got Sydney Uni’s support to stand up and peddle your murderous hate speeches,’ which is what we see it,” he said.

“You’ve got 180,000 people killed, as we said, for no other reason than strategic control of the region’s oil resources. And the anti-Muslim racism that’s been whipped up to justify this war is being felt by Sydney University students,” said Mr Gibson.

Selecting An Urban Wear}

Filed under: Clothing — 3DpXs5 @ 1:57 am, .

Submitted by: Peter Johnn

It is clear that in urban centers, people spend much of their money through wholesale urban wears. The fact is that many adopt the dressing styles of top celebrities, which are certainly high in terms of prices. The stores offering wholesale urban wear keep plenty of these types of clothing.

It is a little bit difficult for a person in need to choose the best and the most reliable wholesaler to supply the needed clothing. The process of buying wholesale urban wear needs a lot of care since the kind of clothing dealt with here is special in one way or the other. They are, in most cases, designer clothing and are available in very many types.

This is a type of a collection of millions of designer clothing and others are made in a special skill to suit the need of consumers. In the case where a consumer needs a unique type of cloth, he/she may need to choose the up-to-date dealer.

As far as choosing a reliable producer to supply, the buyer needs to have considered some factors such as the following.

Some of the factors to be considered when choosing the dealer are selecting one with high integrity and trustworthiness. These dealers are likely to offer the best service. By considering the integrity of producers in the online arena, one is able to avoid scamsters. It is advisable for the buyer to first rely on website as a way of knowing the many different producers running legitimate stores.

The other important factor to consider is having the fees, charges, or simply put, the cost per item to be bought. This is vital since most of the dealers may try to overprice the clothing to a new buyer. Others may try to sell the new clothing that has never been to the market expensively, and thus steal from the customers.

In some cases, the manufacturers of urban wear uses certain specific wholesalers to distribute their clothing as a way of ensuring that their clothing are distinct from those of other manufacturers. It would sound better if a buyer chooses such wholesalers from one manufacturer. This helps one to be certain about the originality of the clothing.

There are other types of urban wholesalers who may offer sale services and in this case, if a buyer of wholesale urban wear is buying in large scale, it would serve best if they make their purchase from a dealer of wholesale urban wear. Some of the after-sale services include guarantee that the items are of high quality and may be returned back at the store. Many sellers are competing on the basis of offering after-sale services and because most dealers are looking forward to making profits, they will be attracted to these sellers.

Urban mood of dressing that has brought about special ways of dressing and dressing styles, has to some extent, influenced the rural people who are now considering wholesale urban wear in a large extent. However, large scale consumption of wholesale urban wear is mostly in towns and this differentiates them from rural-based ways of dressing.

It can be concluded that urban wears are popular around towns. It should be noted also that urban wears differ depending on the individual taste and preferences. Mostly, dealers of urban wears need to be able to quickly identify when new fashions come up by linking with designers and up-to-date manufacturers.

About the Author:

Wholesale Clothing

It is always profitable to source the merchandise from wholesale clothing suppliers. Since they only can offer better discounts and good quality. Click here for the best

Urban Wear

.

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

isnare.com/?aid=1078766&ca=Business }

Mao-style suits fading away in China

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 1:57 am, .

Thursday, March 17, 2005

File:Nixon Mao 1972-02-29.png

The famous “Mao suit”, prominently worn by Chinese leaders in the decades following that country’s 1949 revolution, is on the verge of disappearing from China, as the fashion-conscious younger generation shuns the previously common style in favor of the latest apparel offered by modern designers.

China’s President Hu Jintao was last seen in a green Mao suit while visiting a military base during the Chinese New Year.

During the recent National People’s Congress gathering in Beijing, Sun Fucai, manager of the official Red Capital clothing store, reported that Mao suits made up only five percent of his sales.

One shopkeeper near Beijing, Hu Bixing, sells Mao suits, but hasn’t worn his own Mao suit for about ten years. He says they are “…so out of fashion.”

In China, the style of dress is still worn by older urban dwellers, and many farmers still wear the hat which typically accompanies the suit, called a “Liberation” cap.

The Mao suit has a long history in China, going back to 1912, when it became known as a “Zhongshan suit”, because Sun Yat-sen, or Sun Zhongshan as he is more commonly known in Chinese, popularized the style as the president of the Republic of China. It was later made famous by the communist Mao Zedong during his reign as the leader of China.

One Mao suit owner remembers purchasing what for him was a very expensive version of the suit when it was more popular several decades ago.

“I haven’t worn it in 20 years,” said government-employed driver Zhang Xiaotong. “If I put it on today people would look at me like I was a bit odd.”

Rhode Island congressman Patrick Kennedy involved in car accident near U.S. Capitol

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 2:01 am, May 17, 2017.

Friday, May 5, 2006

U.S. Representative Patrick J. Kennedy (DRI), son of Massachusetts Senator Edward Kennedy, was involved in a traffic accident near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Capitol Hill Police reported that Kennedy was alone his 1997 Ford Mustang when the accident occurred Thursday at about 2:45 a.m. EDT (0645 UTC) near the 100 block of C Street SE. Police say his eyes were red and watery, and he was unbalanced and had slurred speech. Police also say that Kennedy had received three “notices of infractions” that are connected with the crash.

According to the police report, Kennedy drove his car into a security barrier near the Capitol building. When questioned by the police, he told them that he was “headed to the Capitol to make a vote,” when no votes were scheduled for that time of the morning.

Kennedy said in a written statement that he had returned home around midnight and had taken the sleep aid Ambien and the anti-nausea drug Phenergan, both of which are known to cause drowsiness and sedation. He awakened a couple hours later and was “disoriented” when the incident occurred. He also said that “at no time before the accident” did he take alcohol, and pledged to cooperate in any investigation.

Today, Kennedy said, “Apparently, I was disoriented from the medication” and that he “never asked for any preferential treatment.” He also announced that he is checking himself into the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

“I know I need help. As in every recovery, each day has its ups and downs.,” added Kennedy. This is not the first time Kennedy has been to the Mayo Clinic. Last Christmas, Kennedy spent time at the clinic and went back to work after he was “feeling focused and in good shape.”

However; Robin Costello, spokeswoman for Kennedy said, “we have no knowledge of any citations,” but she did admit that a report was filed.

Capitol Police have not commented on the report or allegations, but Sgt. Kimberly Schneider, Capitol Police spokeswoman did say, “The United States Capitol Police are continuing to investigate.”

It is not known whether any sobriety test or arrest was made. Kennedy was not injured.

 This story has updates See Rhode Island representative Patrick Kennedy pleads guilty to DUI, June 13, 2006 

British Airways Flight 38 investigation focuses on fuel system

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 2:01 am, .

Saturday, January 26, 2008

Investigators examining the wreck of British Airways Flight 38, a Boeing 777 that crash landed short of the runway at London’s Heathrow Airport in the first hull loss of a 777, are examining the aircraft’s fuel system as a possible factor in the crash. No-one was killed as the scheduled flight from Beijing, China lost power during final approach on January 17.

136 passengers and 16 crew were on board when power was lost to the two Rolls-Royce engines about two miles from the runway, at a height of 600 feet. Autopilot and autothrottle were engaged at the time, the latter having just commanded an increase of thrust to the engines when power was lost. Co-pilot John Coward, in control at the time, was subsequently praised for being able to glide the disabled plane to within 1,000 feet of the runway, clearing a number of houses along the way.

Subsequent investigation has revealed that not only did the engines not fail simultaneously, but neither failed completely, contradicting initial belief. A preliminary report by the United Kingdom’s Aircraft Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) stated that after the autothrottle commanded more thrust “The engines both initially responded but after about 3 seconds the thrust of the right engine reduced. Some eight seconds later the thrust reduced on the left engine to a similar level… Both engines continued to produce thrust at an engine speed above flight idle, but less than the commanded thrust.” This situation prevailed until impact.

On Wednesday the AAIB stated that they were examining “All possible scenarios that could explain the thrust reduction and continued lack of response of the engines.” However, it also went on to specifically mention attention to the jet’s fuel system, saying “This work includes a detailed analysis and examination of the complete fuel-flow path from the aircraft tanks to the engine-fuel nozzles.” The AAIB also ruled out the plane having completely run out of fuel, stating that there was “adequate fuel” in the tanks when the plane crashed. In addition to the fuel required to get to the target destination or emergency alternative airport – whichever is further – aircraft typically carry between thirty and forty-five minutes worth of extra fuel as a safety margin.

Possible scenarios being examined include fuel contamination, coming either from fuel taken on at Beijing or leakage from an unknown source. In particular, a heavy contaminant at the bottom of the tanks would explain a lack of earlier problems on the flight, as the fuel levels would only have become low in the final stages of the trip. Another possibility is that a central part of the fuel system developed a leak, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engines.

It is known that, according to the AAIB, “the autothrottle and engine-control commands were performing as expected prior to, and after, the reduction in thrust,” suggesting that all software in the aircraft was functioning correctly and rendering a software failure unlikely, although this possibility also remains under investigation.

Diversity And Inclusion: Road Map To Better Business Performance}

Filed under: Outdoor Furniture — 3DpXs5 @ 1:42 am, May 15, 2017.

Diversity and Inclusion: Road map to better business performance

by

Carl Braun

Diversity & Inclusion, though intrinsically entwined, represent two distinctive efforts in the promotion of equality. The former serves as a beacon of light that guides us towards cultural acceptance, while inclusion is an ongoing process of ensuring that lessons learned through diversity are implemented in a real world fashion. The election of Barak Obama shows us this can be done, and reaffirms were on the right track. Nothing More. Nothing Less.

Steven Garcia, Vice-President of DiversityWorking.com says, “The overwhelming support of an African American President clarifies that our nation understands the importance of providing opportunity at the highest level for all individuals. This support shows that Americans are expecting to see opportunities for everyone within Corporate America. Companies with no diversity programs within their organizations are behind the times, and need to understand that diversity branding is a key aspect to their market outreach. By having the first African American President, the nation has brought diversity outreach to the forefront so that companies make a stronger effort to include everyone within their organizations”.

Thought Leadership in this area is driven by leaders from large corporations who see lucrative business reasons for improved diversity & inclusion. Smart companies are ensuring that they have workforces that reflect a changing customer base. Here, revenue drives social changeor does it? More appropriately, we can say that social change drives revenue, and smart companies are quick to take advantage of it.

Eric Watson, Vice-President of Diversity & Inclusion for Food Lion grocery stores and one of the nations foremost thought leaders, had some salient points, “In corporations, there must still be Individual Behavior Change and Organizational Culture Change. Recently, the Conference Board Council on Work Force Diversity developed key competencies for Diversity Practitioners in the 21st century. Among them is a healthy respect for the values of change management; a broader, global perspective on diversity; and a strong relationship to the core of the business.”

More and more organizations today are striving to tie diversity and inclusion to their cultural DNA to increase performance, productivity, and customer satisfaction. Dedicated organizations are leading the development of diversity priorities and goals, and providing equitable distribution of rewards and opportunities to all employees based on their quantifiable contributions to the organization, free from biases and prejudices.

Carl Braun is a principal in The Inclusive Group, an executive search and

career consulting firm

with offices in San Francisco and San Diego. He is also the CEO of Cross-Post LLC, leaders in diversity cross-posting with newspapers and niche

job boards

. He is generally regarded as an expert in diversity and Internet recruiting having published many articles on the subject. He can be reached at cfbraun@inclusiv.net

Article Source:

eArticlesOnline.com }

G20 protests: Inside a labour march

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 1:42 am, .
Wikinews accredited reporter Killing Vector traveled to the G-20 2009 summit protests in London with a group of protesters. This is his personal account.

Friday, April 3, 2009

London – “Protest”, says Ross Saunders, “is basically theatre”.

It’s seven a.m. and I’m on a mini-bus heading east on the M4 motorway from Cardiff toward London. I’m riding with seventeen members of the Cardiff Socialist Party, of which Saunders is branch secretary for the Cardiff West branch; they’re going to participate in a march that’s part of the protests against the G-20 meeting.

Before we boarded the minibus Saunders made a speech outlining the reasons for the march. He said they were “fighting for jobs for young people, fighting for free education, fighting for our share of the wealth, which we create.” His anger is directed at the government’s response to the economic downturn: “Now that the recession is underway, they’ve been trying to shoulder more of the burden onto the people, and onto the young people…they’re expecting us to pay for it.” He compared the protest to the Jarrow March and to the miners’ strikes which were hugely influential in the history of the British labour movement. The people assembled, though, aren’t miners or industrial workers — they’re university students or recent graduates, and the march they’re going to participate in is the Youth Fight For Jobs.

The Socialist Party was formerly part of the Labour Party, which has ruled the United Kingdom since 1997 and remains a member of the Socialist International. On the bus, Saunders and some of his cohorts — they occasionally, especially the older members, address each other as “comrade” — explains their view on how the split with Labour came about. As the Third Way became the dominant voice in the Labour Party, culminating with the replacement of Neil Kinnock with Tony Blair as party leader, the Socialist cadre became increasingly disaffected. “There used to be democratic structures, political meetings” within the party, they say. The branch meetings still exist but “now, they passed a resolution calling for renationalisation of the railways, and they [the party leadership] just ignored it.” They claim that the disaffection with New Labour has caused the party to lose “half its membership” and that people are seeking alternatives. Since the economic crisis began, Cardiff West’s membership has doubled, to 25 members, and the RMT has organized itself as a political movement running candidates in the 2009 EU Parliament election. The right-wing British National Party or BNP is making gains as well, though.

Talk on the bus is mostly political and the news of yesterday’s violence at the G-20 demonstrations, where a bank was stormed by protesters and 87 were arrested, is thick in the air. One member comments on the invasion of a RBS building in which phone lines were cut and furniture was destroyed: “It’s not very constructive but it does make you smile.” Another, reading about developments at the conference which have set France and Germany opposing the UK and the United States, says sardonically, “we’re going to stop all the squabbles — they’re going to unite against us. That’s what happens.” She recounts how, in her native Sweden during the Second World War, a national unity government was formed among all major parties, and Swedish communists were interned in camps, while Nazi-leaning parties were left unmolested.

In London around 11am the march assembles on Camberwell Green. About 250 people are here, from many parts of Britain; I meet marchers from Newcastle, Manchester, Leicester, and especially organized-labor stronghold Sheffield. The sky is grey but the atmosphere is convivial; five members of London’s Metropolitan Police are present, and they’re all smiling. Most marchers are young, some as young as high school age, but a few are older; some teachers, including members of the Lewisham and Sheffield chapters of the National Union of Teachers, are carrying banners in support of their students.

Gordon Brown’s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!’

Stewards hand out sheets of paper with the words to call-and-response chants on them. Some are youth-oriented and education-oriented, like the jaunty “Gordon Brown‘s a Tory/He wears a Tory hat/And when he saw our uni fees/He said ‘I’ll double that!'” (sung to the tune of the Lonnie Donegan song “My Old Man’s a Dustman“); but many are standbys of organized labour, including the infamous “workers of the world, unite!“. It also outlines the goals of the protest, as “demands”: “The right to a decent job for all, with a living wage of at least £8 and hour. No to cheap labour apprenticeships! for all apprenticeships to pay at least the minimum wage, with a job guaranteed at the end. No to university fees. support the campaign to defeat fees.” Another steward with a megaphone and a bright red t-shirt talks the assembled protesters through the basics of call-and-response chanting.

Finally the march gets underway, traveling through the London boroughs of Camberwell and Southwark. Along the route of the march more police follow along, escorting and guiding the march and watching it carefully, while a police van with flashing lights clears the route in front of it. On the surface the atmosphere is enthusiastic, but everyone freezes for a second as a siren is heard behind them; it turns out to be a passing ambulance.

Crossing Southwark Bridge, the march enters the City of London, the comparably small but dense area containing London’s financial and economic heart. Although one recipient of the protesters’ anger is the Bank of England, the march does not stop in the City, only passing through the streets by the London Exchange. Tourists on buses and businessmen in pinstripe suits record snippets of the march on their mobile phones as it passes them; as it goes past a branch of HSBC the employees gather at the glass store front and watch nervously. The time in the City is brief; rather than continue into the very centre of London the march turns east and, passing the Tower of London, proceeds into the poor, largely immigrant neighbourhoods of the Tower Hamlets.

The sun has come out, and the spirits of the protesters have remained high. But few people, only occasional faces at windows in the blocks of apartments, are here to see the march and it is in Wapping High Street that I hear my first complaint from the marchers. Peter, a steward, complains that the police have taken the march off its original route and onto back streets where “there’s nobody to protest to”. I ask how he feels about the possibility of violence, noting the incidents the day before, and he replies that it was “justified aggression”. “We don’t condone it but people have only got certain limitations.”

There’s nobody to protest to!

A policeman I ask is very polite but noncommittal about the change in route. “The students are getting the message out”, he says, so there’s no problem. “Everyone’s very well behaved” in his assessment and the atmosphere is “very positive”. Another protestor, a sign-carrying university student from Sheffield, half-heartedly returns the compliment: today, she says, “the police have been surprisingly unridiculous.”

The march pauses just before it enters Cable Street. Here, in 1936, was the site of the Battle of Cable Street, and the march leader, addressing the protesters through her megaphone, marks the moment. She draws a parallel between the British Union of Fascists of the 1930s and the much smaller BNP today, and as the protesters follow the East London street their chant becomes “The BNP tell racist lies/We fight back and organise!”

In Victoria Park — “The People’s Park” as it was sometimes known — the march stops for lunch. The trade unions of East London have organized and paid for a lunch of hamburgers, hot dogs, french fries and tea, and, picnic-style, the marchers enjoy their meals as organized labor veterans give brief speeches about industrial actions from a small raised platform.

A demonstration is always a means to and end.

During the rally I have the opportunity to speak with Neil Cafferky, a Galway-born Londoner and the London organizer of the Youth Fight For Jobs march. I ask him first about why, despite being surrounded by red banners and quotes from Karl Marx, I haven’t once heard the word “communism” used all day. He explains that, while he considers himself a Marxist and a Trotskyist, the word communism has negative connotations that would “act as a barrier” to getting people involved: the Socialist Party wants to avoid the discussion of its position on the USSR and disassociate itself from Stalinism. What the Socialists favor, he says, is “democratic planned production” with “the working class, the youths brought into the heart of decision making.”

On the subject of the police’s re-routing of the march, he says the new route is actually the synthesis of two proposals. Originally the march was to have gone from Camberwell Green to the Houses of Parliament, then across the sites of the 2012 Olympics and finally to the ExCel Centre. The police, meanwhile, wanted there to be no march at all.

The Metropolitan Police had argued that, with only 650 trained traffic officers on the force and most of those providing security at the ExCel Centre itself, there simply wasn’t the manpower available to close main streets, so a route along back streets was necessary if the march was to go ahead at all. Cafferky is sceptical of the police explanation. “It’s all very well having concern for health and safety,” he responds. “Our concern is using planning to block protest.”

He accuses the police and the government of having used legal, bureaucratic and even violent means to block protests. Talking about marches having to defend themselves, he says “if the police set out with the intention of assaulting marches then violence is unavoidable.” He says the police have been known to insert “provocateurs” into marches, which have to be isolated. He also asserts the right of marches to defend themselves when attacked, although this “must be done in a disciplined manner”.

He says he wasn’t present at yesterday’s demonstrations and so can’t comment on the accusations of violence against police. But, he says, there is often provocative behavior on both sides. Rather than reject violence outright, Cafferky argues that there needs to be “clear political understanding of the role of violence” and calls it “counter-productive”.

Demonstration overall, though, he says, is always a useful tool, although “a demonstration is always a means to an end” rather than an end in itself. He mentions other ongoing industrial actions such as the occupation of the Visteon plant in Enfield; 200 fired workers at the factory have been occupying the plant since April 1, and states the solidarity between the youth marchers and the industrial workers.

I also speak briefly with members of the International Bolshevik Tendency, a small group of left-wing activists who have brought some signs to the rally. The Bolsheviks say that, like the Socialists, they’re Trotskyists, but have differences with them on the idea of organization; the International Bolshevik Tendency believes that control of the party representing the working class should be less democratic and instead be in the hands of a team of experts in history and politics. Relations between the two groups are “chilly”, says one.

At 2:30 the march resumes. Rather than proceeding to the ExCel Centre itself, though, it makes its way to a station of London’s Docklands Light Railway; on the way, several of East London’s school-aged youths join the march, and on reaching Canning Town the group is some 300 strong. Proceeding on foot through the borough, the Youth Fight For Jobs reaches the protest site outside the G-20 meeting.

It’s impossible to legally get too close to the conference itself. Police are guarding every approach, and have formed a double cordon between the protest area and the route that motorcades take into and out of the conference venue. Most are un-armed, in the tradition of London police; only a few even carry truncheons. Closer to the building, though, a few machine gun-armed riot police are present, standing out sharply in their black uniforms against the high-visibility yellow vests of the Metropolitan Police. The G-20 conference itself, which started a few hours before the march began, is already winding down, and about a thousand protesters are present.

I see three large groups: the Youth Fight For Jobs avoids going into the center of the protest area, instead staying in their own group at the admonition of the stewards and listening to a series of guest speakers who tell them about current industrial actions and the organization of the Youth Fight’s upcoming rally at UCL. A second group carries the Ogaden National Liberation Front‘s flag and is campaigning for recognition of an autonomous homeland in eastern Ethiopia. Others protesting the Ethiopian government make up the third group; waving old Ethiopian flags, including the Lion of Judah standard of emperor Haile Selassie, they demand that foreign aid to Ethiopia be tied to democratization in that country: “No recovery without democracy”.

A set of abandoned signs tied to bollards indicate that the CND has been here, but has already gone home; they were demanding the abandonment of nuclear weapons. But apart from a handful of individuals with handmade, cardboard signs I see no groups addressing the G-20 meeting itself, other than the Youth Fight For Jobs’ slogans concerning the bailout. But when a motorcade passes, catcalls and jeers are heard.

It’s now 5pm and, after four hours of driving, five hours marching and one hour at the G-20, Cardiff’s Socialists are returning home. I board the bus with them and, navigating slowly through the snarled London traffic, we listen to BBC Radio 4. The news is reporting on the closure of the G-20 conference; while they take time out to mention that Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper delayed the traditional group photograph of the G-20’s world leaders because “he was on the loo“, no mention is made of today’s protests. Those listening in the bus are disappointed by the lack of coverage.

Most people on the return trip are tired. Many sleep. Others read the latest issue of The Socialist, the Socialist Party’s newspaper. Mia quietly sings “The Internationale” in Swedish.

Due to the traffic, the journey back to Cardiff will be even longer than the journey to London. Over the objections of a few of its members, the South Welsh participants in the Youth Fight For Jobs stop at a McDonald’s before returning to the M4 and home.

Victoria Wyndham on Another World and another life

Filed under: Uncategorized — 3DpXs5 @ 1:44 am, May 14, 2017.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Victoria Wyndham was one of the most seasoned and accomplished actresses in daytime soap opera television. She played Rachel Cory, the maven of Another World‘s fictional town, Bay City, from 1972 to 1999 when the show went off the air. Wyndham talks about how she was seen as the anchor of a show, and the political infighting to keep it on the air as NBC wanted to wrest control of the long-running soap from Procter & Gamble. Wyndham fought to keep it on the air, but eventually succumbed to the inevitable. She discusses life on the soap opera, and the seven years she spent wandering “in the woods” of Los Angeles seeking direction, now divorced from a character who had come to define her professional career. Happy, healthy and with a family she is proud of, Wyndham has found life after the death of Another World in painting and animals. Below is David Shankbone’s interview with the soap diva.

Contents

  • 1 Career and motherhood
  • 2 The politics behind the demise of Another World
  • 3 Wyndham’s efforts to save Another World
  • 4 The future of soap operas
  • 5 Wyndham’s career and making it as a creative
  • 6 Television’s lust for youth
  • 7 Her relationship today to the character Rachel Cory
  • 8 Wyndham on a higher power and the creative process
  • 9 After AW: Wyndham lost in California
  • 10 Wyndham discovers painting
  • 11 Wyndham on the state of the world
  • 12 Source
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